Friday, February 13, 2015

More on Advice for Young White Men

Podcast.

This was another excellent Johnson-Le Brun podcast.  I have already critiqued many of the ideas presented here.  A few further comments, some of which overlap with my past analysis.

I found the last part of the talk the section for which I had the most agreement.  We need collective action, we need tribalism, we need networking, we need reliability, and we need to eschew the defectives.  The problem with all of that is no one actually wants to do it: culling the anti-racist trolls, conspiracy-theorists, Aryans from Atlantis types from being taken seriously, from being allowed to comment on blog threads - that would be a small start, a tiny step, but no one wants even to do that. And the only folks I see trying to community build are the “neckbeard” types and you are not going to have fully functional communities with the “top 20%” with that leadership, more likely you’ll get the “bottom 10%.”  Also, the “ethnic affirmative action policy” of the “movement” needs to end, but that would necessitate jettisoning the whole Gunther-Pierce-Kemp sci-fi/fantasy school of racial thought, and the “movement” seems to have too much invested in those memes to make a clean break.

Other points:

As advertised, the talk is aimed at young White men.  Older folks will not gain anything very useful from this advice.

Unlike Brun, I am no fan of Greene’s work, which I find internally inconsistent, too abstract, and not realistic for many real-life situations.  I have already written on this in detail, so I need not repeat myself. It's real utility is to identify manipulative techniques of others (in that way it is useful in some real-life situations), but I would not use it as a primer for your own behavior.

Also, if we are to find niches to suit our strengths and personalities: some people are, by nature, introverted, highly moralistic, sarcastic, grouchy, etc.  There are indeed careers and activities well suited for such types, dismissing them as “Debbie Downers” is casually juvenile, particularly when such people can provide valuable insights and harsh truth-telling when such is required.  Rather a reliable and intelligent and productive pessimist than a cheerfully moronic and useless optimist.

Certainly, in most circumstances, one should not mix politics with work, in the sense of an offensive (in the military, not moral, sense) direct promotion of White nationalism.  But, in the name of “democratic multiculturalism,” there may be ways of “monkey wrenching” the System independent of openly declaring racialist views.  If you are being racially abused and discriminated against AND you are in a position to (relatively safely, even in some cases anonymously at first) protest against it, then do so.  You are not doing it as an open and declared opponent to multiculturalism, quite the contrary, you are basically challenging the multiculturalists to take their own rhetoric at face value and to take their ideology to its logical conclusion: everyone is obsessed with their “identity” and everyone is “discriminated against” and everyone “has a problem that needs to be solved.”  The point is: do not make yourself the problem, instead very patiently and very carefully spin your web so as to make the multiculturalists the problem.  Imagine: the high priests of diversity at “Company X” revealed as “hateful racist and sexist bigots!”  Of course, to be successful, one needs to have the “right touch,” extreme patience (it may take months or even years of slow and careful effort), one must be a clever counter-puncher, and one must have the sure instinct of how far one can go and when one should back off.  It’s not for everyone and not for every situation, but the same can be said of the Johnson-Le Brun advice. If your situation falls into the category in which “democratic multiculturalism” is possible, do so.

I wonder if some of Le Brun's comments on strategic thinking and cunning subterfuge was meant as an endorsement of Le Pen's mainstreaming; however, I think Le Brun would agree that the "proof the pudding" here is the outcome.  If Le Pen succeeds in genuinely advancing racial nationalism (even if indirectly) one could in part forgive (but not forget) some of her "transgressions;" however, in the absence of such success, then this "mainstreaming" would be a pragmatic failure in addition to being a moral disgrace.

In general, however, the Johnson-Le Brun advice is sound.