EGI Notes

Wednesday, February 17, 2016

Relevance of the Space Beagle

Scifi making a point.

The science fiction book Voyage of the Space Beagle (four short stories stitched together to make a coherent novel) is an interesting work. This is particularly true since Spenglerian "cyclical history" provides a basic foundation for the underlying sociopolitical paradigms present in the book. Also, with one unfortunate exception, all of the characters seem to be White, for the most part, but not exclusively, (based on surnames) of British Isles stock.

Three negatives:

1. The main protagonist, Grosvenor, near the end of the book, disparages the importance of "blood and race" with respect to the workings of history.

2. That character is an obnoxious dickweed: I prefer the main human antagonist, Kent.

3. There is a Japanese character portrayed positively, unusual since these stories were written 1939-1950.

A relevant quote from the book:

It seemed to Grosvenor that he was learning slowly but surely how to influence men.  It was not enough to have information and knowledge, not enough to be right.  Men had to be persuaded and convinced.  Sometimes that might take more time than could safely be spared.  Sometimes it couldn't be done at all. And so civilizations crumbled, battles were lost, and ships destroyed because the man or group with the saving ideas would not go through the long-drawn-out ritual of convincing others.

That is relevant to the "movement" in two ways.  First, racial nationalists seem unable or unwilling to do what is necessary to convince Whites of the race problem and possible solutions; hence, our civilization crumbles. Second, within the "movement" itself, the sane faction is unable or unwilling to deal with all the Nutzis, fetishists, trolls, quota queens, and neckbeards in order to get the racial nationalist house in order so as to deal effectively with the first problem - persuading Whites as a race.

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