EGI Notes

Thursday, October 27, 2016

Barriers To improvement

A flawed business model.

According to the standard business model, when a business is incompetent, it will be out-performed by competitors, and eventually go out of business, being replaced by those more competent, effective competitors.

Why then does Der Movement and its quota queen "leadership" go on and on, despite a decades-long record of unremitting failure?

Some ideas (not meant to be a fully comprehensive list):

1. Der Movement is catering to a narrow niche market.  It wants to grow, certainly, but there is right now insufficient "open niche space" for new things to be easily tried (but with difficult effort all things are possible) and for new competitors to become established without running afoul of the heavy hand of monopolization.

2. There are strong barriers for entry to this market, thus barring the way for increased competition. Some of these barriers are external; e.g., social pricing and other forms of persecution from the System, which in turn makes it impossible for most people to be full-time activists, etc. These external pressures are not only a cause of "movement" dysfunction, but also a result of it: a more competent "movement" would have by this time developed approaches to at least partially resist some of these pressures. Internal barriers include the freakishness and defectiveness found in Der Movement, which is a major "turn-off" for the more sane, reasonable, and effective people who otherwise would become more deeply involved in it. Another internal barrier is reason #3.

3. Der Movement's strict ethnic affirmative action program serves as a sort of "protectionist tariff," preserving the quota queen monopoly, and which, together with the other internal and external barriers to market entry, prevent some effective competitors from getting a foothold in the market.  This is by no means a "free market" in any sense of the word "free."

4. A deluded customer base that in some cases doesn't even realize how badly it is being served and if they do realize it are unable to discern some of the reasons why  In fact, the customer base in in some cases actually complicit in the problems, by demonstrating defective freakishness, by supporting the affirmative action policy, and by enabling "leadership" dysfunction.

Educating the customer base would seem a reasonable first step toward beginning to alleviate these problems; however, expect the quota queens to resist any attempt to break their monopoly.


Labels: , , , , , ,