Monday, February 26, 2018

Camel, Lion, Child Redux

Nietzsche’s three metamorphoses.

I believe I already wrote about this, but for the benefit of new readers (and for cognitively deficient Type I established readers) I will repeat this concept, and its relevance to what the long-term objectives here are.


These are a metaphor for the three stages men have to go through, in their path towards moral self-sufficiency.The camel is a "beast of burden", that is, it carries a weight someone else has put on it. When the person is the "camel", they don't follow their own moral judgement, but have instead a set of external rules they've been told are right. "Thou shalt" and the dragon refer to the Ten Commandments and the Church.
Someone becomes the lion when they realise those rules they've been taught through their lives aren't necessarily immutable truths. The lion looks at the conventions and morals he thought were the only possibility and tears them apart. "There is no Good, there is no Evil"... This is that "sacred no"; the realisation that these are man-made concepts and the choice to reject them.
However, the lion can only destroy, it's just an act of nihilism. After the lion has done away with those morals imposed from outside, the child will be the one creating new values. Not out of duty to an external force or out of rebellion against it, but for itself. The child is pure creativity. That is his "sacred yes" to life.

The camel accepts established dogma and bears the burden of working within a constrained tradition. The lion rebels against that dogma and tradition, realizing that there is no reason to accept those dogmas and traditions as “immutable truths.”  The lion deconstructs, rejects, destroys.  Finally, the child enters the scene and creates new values, new traditions – “pure creativity.”  Over time, this process can repeat itself, if necessary.  The child’s creation may fossilize into a dogma, burdening camels, and leading to lions.

So, I spent many years as a “movement” camel, accepting dogma and following flawed “leaders.”  Much of the work of EGI Notes is the lion phase – what fossilized Type I activists call my “crazed bitterness” – deconstructing, rejecting, and opposing the “movement,” with the objective of destroying the Old Movement, to make way for the New.  And, finally, some of my work at both EGI Notes and Western Destiny is the child creative phase – creating a New Movement based on a fresh set of values – the Fundamentals.